sábado, 16 de mayo de 2009

Drug may increase survival in brain cancer patients


David Muñoz Carmona
Abstract #2017, Saturday, May 30, 2009. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.Michael Gruber, M.D., clinical professor of neurology and neurosurgeryShahzad Raza, M.D., clinical research associate in the department of radiation oncologyAshwatha Narayana, M.D., associate professor of radiation oncology
Bevacizumab is a cancer treatment approved by the FDA to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, lung, and breast cancers, and relapsed malignant glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. A small study by researchers at NYU suggests the drug may have a role in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The treatment, which inhibits tumor growth by blocking the formation of new blood vessels, was given to 24 glioblastoma patients who also received radiation and concomitant chemotherapy; another 31 patients received similar treatments but without bevacizumab. The group receiving bevacizumab lived longer during and after treatment without their disease worsening - half of the patients lived without their disease worsening a median of 12 months, compared to seven months in the non-bevacizumab group. One- and two-year overall survival rates were 85 percent and 50 percent, respectively, in the bevacizumab group compared to 74 percent and 22 percent in the other group. The researchers say that the results are encouraging and the drug merits testing in a phase III study.

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